The combat effective couch commando

FRIENDSVILLE, Tenn. – “I forgot how to do homework. My back is killing me. I need to get off of this old couch.”

“Then you need to take care of that,” my wife recently told me over the phone from Missouri. “There’s no one there besides you to see it and point that out.”

“You’d think for a writer that I’d have telework down,” I replied. “I need to use a desk and a good chair. I’m too old to get by long with poor posture.”

Alright. In perspective, my aches and pains are small potatoes in this terrible pandemic. Hardship and suffering are rampant. And I was not battling the virus or at any significant risk, unlike our courageous health care workers and essential services workers. I was working from home, writing an article about how U.S. Air Force Airmen assigned to the I.G. Brown Training and Education Center are teleworking.

As it turns out, that and my hurt back all got me thinking about ergonomics. Continue reading “The combat effective couch commando”

Anticipate this to help, for any disaster

Disasters don’t plan ahead. You can. The official logo for National Preparedness Month 2017. (Photo illustration by Ready.gov.)

Why check your emergency information? September is National Preparedness Month. Americans know natural disasters, if not from personal experiences, then through others’. Anticipating a disaster helps ensure our preparedness.

I’ll share my first memory, of Tropical Storm Carrie in 1972. I was four. I don’t recall much except that we had a gas stove and my mom popped corn in the dark while the thunder boomed outside. (I realize that this is small in comparison to disasters others faced, but it was pretty scary. So it must be for the kids in Houston.)

As Hurricane Harvey reminds us, while our memories fade, events may spring unrealized, anywhere and anytime. All severe weather can cause significant damage and risk of life. The need for proper emergency planning is critical in response. So if you’re with me, this might be our fair warning to recheck our records and plans for ourselves, family and friends.

Continue reading “Anticipate this to help, for any disaster”

Training center, experts urge safety in path of solar eclipse

(Image: The Minuteman statue outside Patriot Hall at the Air National Guard’s I.G. Brown Training and Education Center in East Tennessee dons a pair of eclipse glasses, June 22, 2017, to emphasize the need for safe viewing of the coming solar eclipse.)

The I.G. Brown Training and Education Center staff, as well as students lucky enough to be assigned here Monday, August 21, will be seated directly in the path of totality during the North American Eclipse.

McGhee Tyson Air National Guard Base in East Tennessee borders both cities inside the area where the moon completely blocks light from the sun. Given good weather, experts predict those in Louisville, Tenn., should expect to see the partial phase beginning at 1:04 PM (EDT) and up to total blackout at 2:33 PM, lasting for 1 minute and 26 seconds. Those in Alcoa, Tenn. will see 1 minute 24 seconds of totality.

Continue reading “Training center, experts urge safety in path of solar eclipse”