Every dog has its day

Every dog has its day
a short story

Rob Bartell spent sessions with his therapist discussing methods to channel his anger. Now he focused on cranking the window down in his cheap rental. The cool air refreshed him. The folded American flag and medal they tossed him at the capital were in a backpack on the passenger seat. He still felt the governor’s handshake, which tried to match his.

[You were there, Bro.]

He could not recall what the governor said, but instead remembered that the man looked up at him. Bartell stood a stocky six-foot-seven. His Army recruiter told him that he represented the poster boy for the Lynyrd Skynyrd song that went, “lean and mean, and big and bad, Lord.

He sat cramped in the little car and breathed consciously, slowly, in and out. “Suck it,” he whispered on exhale. Parked, with his head on the wheel, his hands remained unaltered from the mad grip that connected skill and anger in road rage.

He drove here daydreaming when something bounced off the windshield. Left, he saw a man hollering,  gesturing and trying to pull alongside in a silver truck. Bartell veered to block the man’s next approach as he’d done in convoys. The truck, forced toward the ditch, pulled behind to avoid the busy oncoming traffic. The man did not relent, and he tried to match Bartell at a faster speed. Bartell braked hard and fell behind to steer into the pickup’s rear bumper. The driver tried to correct but lost traction. The car nearly flipped, fishtailed, and stalled. He sped on.

Bartell’s mood lifted from that fog. He looked around the empty parking lot and expected to see a pickup roaring toward him. A one-lane road offered the only entrance to the riverside park. The battle ended.

[I will waste you.]  Inhale, exhale, inhale.

IMG_0828Dead leaves scattered. Surrounding fields of big river grass yellowed and bent. The park looked void of seasonal boaters who wintered out until Memorial Day. A plastic porta-potty door rocked on one hinge toward a stack of boat docks and picnic tables. Tractor tracks crossed the grass. A bike trail intersected the road beyond. He drove here after the ceremony. It suited him well as a running sanctuary since his homecoming – the fourth deployment after the attacks. He wanted to be alone.

SLAM! The porta-potty’s door lashed to a gust. He flinched. His ghosts rustled as he got out and stretched. He zeroed the chronometer on his watch. He tightened his leg strap and observed the muddy Mohawk waters flow slowly toward the Hudson. The historical marker pointed out where workers camped the river bank two centuries ago as they dug the Erie Canal from Albany to Buffalo.

“I’ve got a mule, her name is Sal,” Bartell mumbled half-heartedly. [Fif-teen miles on the Er-ie Ca-nal.]

A static ran through his head while he checked the car’s front bumper for scratches — a small ding in the plastic cover meant nothing too noticeable. He felt like kicking it in. But he regained himself and thought of mules pulling barges. He thought of ditch diggers with bent backs, their clothes muddy, and shovels of heavy mud. They were resilient, many immigrants, who helped invent modern excavation. The newspapers praised their progress but called their effort worthless. “Clinton’s Ditch,” his father recalled. “The project seemed unfathomable, like men on the moon.”

The street remained void as he ran. He jogged slow, warming up passed stubbed fields of clipped corn stalks that hid scattered deer runs and irrigation pipe. Where the area stopped, he turned right with his breath rapid, onto a crushed-stone bike trail that stretched past a farmhouse and a crooked cow-barn. His feet crunched the cadence. His breath adjusted quicker. He saw a battered, thick-wheeled tractor parked like an odd ornament, out of gas, or maybe under repair. The November air warmed from the bright sunlight; nevertheless, he saw no others. The trail continued 12 miles to the Town of Pallentine. Half paved. The gravel half Bartell favored for his carbon-fiber foot. He also liked the serenity of the forgotten canal nearby. “I can run up to town,” he thought, overzealous. “Then up the highway, maybe to Utica. When would I stop?”

It felt difficult to find that sweet spot, he told his therapist, because his throttle sometimes stuck at high or low, with no cruise. The feelings were too strong, and he failed to see the things now beyond. They prescribed him medications, “for a while.” Their effect in the last two weeks seemed noticeable. He did not feel so battered.

[We’ve hauled some bar-ges in our day
Filled with lum-ber, coal, and hay
And ev-ery inch of-the-way I know
From Al-ban-y to Buff-a-lo.]

IMG_0892Overgrown, the abandoned canal stretched west and paralleled the path, the main road, and the river. Oak and maple trees now filled its low areas where diverted water once floated cargo and people west across the state. His father said that when the railroads came the mule-powered barges were no match for steam engines. Then the thruway.

Bartell’s father considered himself a canal historian. He brought him and his brother once to find an unknown, abandoned lock hidden in the woods. He said he snowshoed to it during a winter storm, as a kid, and whistled on an acorn top for help after twisting his ankle. It’s sheer rock walls were collapsed and half-buried. His father retraced the steps. Bartell was seven, and his brother, John, was nine. Their mother just died, and so they hiked through the woods to cope with the loss. Bartell awed at the massive granite blocks that looked tumbled and turned over by gods rather than decades of river ice. Each block seemed as chiseled as those in a Roman cathedral. He thought to find that magical, rooted place now to keep a chunk of stone over his parent’s graves. Maybe that’s what brought him. He wished his father saw him at the capital. He wanted to recover sooner.

He passed between un-mowed edges of Queen Ann’s lace, purple burdock flowers, and milkweed. He knew the way, soon a low bridge over a creek, and then a long, level ditch.

[Filled with explosives, your boot came off in the muck. We’re trapped. Then that jackass turned back, and after him, to unscrew it. He needed a step, but it’s deep. Up to the hips deep, and it bit a leg off. A disappearing joke in the quicksand that the bullets boiled? No. You’re gone. Never coming back. My mangled meat will also outlast me. Horfreakinray. That’s my joke-a-day. Mine cauterized. Mud took it away.]

A silver truck crossed an intersection ahead of him, slowly. His eyes strained. If the driver approached him, he might hurt him. The medication would not help.

Its tires squealed. It sped on.

Bartell ran unknowingly toward the unmarked grave of Danny McCann, who Sheriff William Stillwell shot dead during the 1818 Canal Strike. The diggers walked off the job after a foreman tried to dry their camp. Thirty young men took out on a cold November night into Palatine. They busted up the town and stalked into the Spraker Inn on River Road. In a wild, drunken stupor, McCann snatched Stillwell’s drink from the bar and proclaimed that no one could stop a man from his right to drink. Stillwell, too old, with one seeing eye, left the room but returned shortly with his young deputy. He then leveled an old musket on the men and told them to get back to camp. McCann leaped toward the sheriff and the others moved over when he crashed to the floor, gunned down in a cloud of powder. The men got their whiskey but were no longer allowed into towns. There would be no trial. They shoveled McCann’s grave as they dug foggy-headed, up the Mohawk Valley toward Buffalo.

[“Shit. Get my leg!”]

Bartell’s team encountered stiff resistance sectors and elaborate minefields on his last patrol as they pressed into insurgent sanctuaries. There were many gunfights, and their efforts to clear the roads bogged them down. The patrols were slowed further by the deep mud and the irrigation ditches that crisscrossed their path. John said they reminded him of the canal, but Bartell realized that the canal back home did not require armor to plow for hidden bombs. They slogged their way forward slowly, through that morning muck when John died. They called for close air support with laser-guided weapons and strafed to flatten enemy positions. Then they came upon an impassable ditch filled with quicksand. Impossible. They inserted on Black Hawks to flank, with their position now under major attack. John thrived in those intense situations. It proved a prowess underestimated by many. “It’s gonna be a mud fight,” John said to him using a weak hillbilly impression. “We’ll crawl right into Clinton’s Ditch.” The orders were to wait, but insurgents targeted the team stuck and exposed down in a flooded, overgrown area. They agreed, they did not have long.

[“It’s an acorn top. You blow across it with your thumbs in a V-shape, and it’ll whistle. Here … you try.”]

What sounded like a sharp “yelp” brought his mind back to his run. Then an orange flash in the corner of his eye. Something flew through the air, into the canal and landed with a wet thud. The sound of breaking tires seemed last.

IMG_0389Bartell stood on the shoulder of the trail, trying to catch his breath. He looked down into a sunken area between the road and the bike path — nothing in focus.

“Bartell, that’s you,” asked a bellied, unshaven man across the way. He looked in his 40s and wore a dirty t-shirt and sweatpants. His hands looked filthy, and dirt marked his side like he crawled from a pit. “I heard you were with the governor. You got the Silver Star, right? You know, I was just messin’, why’ a go off like that?”

Bartell took a deep breath, made a tight fist, and crossed over to the road. The man smelled of cigarettes. He thought to confront him but he suddenly recalled John’s mechanic buddy, Griff. There existed in those personal effects a photo of them drinking at Spraker’s before training. John felt nervous then, which seemed funny since he thought up enlistment.

“My brother, you meant …

[… my brother.]

“It was his. Posthumous.”

“Shit, sorry.”

[A friend of mine once got her sore
Now he’s got a bro-ken jaw
‘Cause she let fly with an iron toe
And kicked him back to Buff-a-lo.]

The two looked down. Blood streaked across the weeds in a red flight path toward the canal for 50 feet. Further down, through the cattails and lying in a stagnant puddle, was a dog. The mechanic’s silver pickup with its trail of brake marks and plastic shards from its front grill shadowed over the grass with a piece of orange-red fur stuck in a shattered headlight. A smell of burnt rubber lingered.

In 1821 Orville McCann parked his wagon near the same spot after a desperate search for his son’s grave, but to no avail. He camped the night and set out toward St. Louis the following morning empty-handed. The man spent weeks on his hands and knees, in muddy fields and with no company to unearth the marker canal workers said they placed. What he did not know was that river ice buried the stone in the winter of 1819. His distant Missouri relatives still recall him saying “that it just wasn’t right, leaving his boy’s bones in that god-be-damned place.”

[Not my blood.]

“It’s an Irish Setter,” Bartell asked no one, unsure in its mangled state. The animal panted, from somewhere. He thought, “maybe a year old?”

Bartell read every news story, book, and magazine he got at Walter Reed to escape. They found him there on occasions in open debate with an empty recovery room, shouting at the by-lines and quotes with his monitor’s alarm tripped. Medics once found a raving madman in his place — Bartell checked out, just for a moment. Months of medical limbo, trying to move again, were maddening; after all, what did anyone know? They came one evening shortly before his move from intensive care to tell him about his father’s severe stroke. He died the day John’s personal effects arrived.

[“… a mud fight.”]

The man with the silver truck flicked a cigarette into the canal and then climbed down its embankment to examine at a closer distance. He hunched over it and folded his face as if he smelled something foul.

“Man’s best or not, they say these injured ones’ ill bite you, if you give ’em a chance.”

IMG_1161Bartell stood silent, now on the edge of the road. The air seemed lighter. He waited, trying to breathe. Steam rose from his heated body with a ghostly effect as passing clouds let in sporadic sunshine. Then a child’s scream from the other side pierced the air and broke the spell. A frantic girl ran toward him, down a driveway and to the road, with no regard. “Casey!” She screamed for the dog.

He thought, “I’m too far,” but this time, he vaulted a great deal using the spring of his prosthesis. Strong and swift, he catapulted the girl clear of traffic, then tumbled down into the ditch.

[On behalf of the State of New York and a grateful nation, I thank you for your brother’s ultimate sacrifice.]

Blurry eyed, he saw her sitting above him. She looked maybe nine. She transformed, calm, like an angel.

[I know, it wasn’t my fault.]

Bartell rolled onto his side. His breath knocked out of him. Then he noticed a battered old gravemarker half-buried in the weeds.

(Written by Mike R. Smith) (Song lyrics, Low Bridge, by Thomas Allen 1913)

This is a work of fiction. Names, characters, businesses, places, events, locales, and incidents are either the products of the author’s imagination or used in a fictitious manner. Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, or actual events is purely coincidental.

Interactive gatherings bypass traditional auditorium events

FRIENDSVILLE, Tenn. — The Air National Guard’s training and education center in East Tennessee recently held two core organizational events virtually that would fill an auditorium under normal circumstances.

The interactive gatherings online included the I.G. Brown Training and Education Center’s quarterly commander’s call, as well as the organization’s all-staff tactical pause day. They are the most extensive and latest gatherings of assigned personnel to be affected by the ongoing coronavirus outbreak. Continue reading “Interactive gatherings bypass traditional auditorium events”

Shared online workouts lift spirits during detachment’s home isolation

Video meeting

FRIENDSVILLE, Tenn. — U.S. Air Force Airmen assigned to the Air National Guard training and education center in East Tennessee are not taking their current seclusion for the global pandemic sitting down but instead exercising through shared video workouts.

The I.G. Brown Training and Education Center’s online fitness classes are a means to tackle the COVID-19 adversity together, said the staff and faculty.

The Tuesday through Friday, 10:20 a.m., workouts are challenging. Still, there is plenty of camaraderie and encouragement that radiates from the computer screen, tablet, or smartphone. The 25-minute Zoom meetings that began on April 7 are open to service members and their families and continue for the foreseeable future.

Continue reading “Shared online workouts lift spirits during detachment’s home isolation”

Air Guard’s primary learning center transforms through homework

TEC Classroom Building

FRIENDSVILLE, Tenn. – The Air National Guard’s primary learning and broadcast center is generating military education solutions for the total U.S. Air Force in immediate and long term challenges, said its Airmen teleworking in East Tennessee this week.

The I.G. Brown Training and Education Center staff are following the guidance and directives of the CDC, the National Guard Bureau, and the Department of Defense concerning COVID-19, which includes personal distancing, teleworking, and other actions to stop the spread.

Continue reading “Air Guard’s primary learning center transforms through homework”

Base’s softball game a home run for camaraderie

ALCOA, Tenn. — Airmen and their families from the Air National Guard’s I.G. Brown Training and Education Center and the Tennessee National Guard’s 134th Air Refueling Wing joined for a unit Vs. unit softball game Friday, May 17, at Springbrook Park in Alcoa, Tennessee.

“This is an opportunity to team build a bit, which does not happen enough,” U.S. Air Force Senior Master Sgt. Juan P. Castro, assigned to the education center, said.

Continue reading “Base’s softball game a home run for camaraderie”

Video highlights Airman’s ‘interesting’ resilience

LOUISVILLE, Tenn. — A video feature that highlights an Airman’s setback and recovery from open heart surgery was published online recently by the Air National Guard’s training and education center.

“I had wanted to produce a feature video about overcoming adversity this year and found Sergeant Wither’s story compelling,” said Master Sgt. Kelly Collett, a videographer assigned to the I.G. Brown Training and Education Center in East Tennessee.

Continue reading “Video highlights Airman’s ‘interesting’ resilience”

Air National Guard chief inspired by mother

Chief Master Sgt. Paula C. Shawhan is not the type of woman to wait idly for her stars to align.

Two months out of high school, Shawhan decided to follow her mother’s military success and enlist in the Air Force Reserve. Now she’s forged 22-years’ service as a medical technician but broadened herself beyond stereotypes as well as with the Air National Guard.

“No women should ever say, ‘I can’t do that because I’m a woman,’” said Shawhan. “I take my experiences, and I find a way to apply them. That’s one of the great things someone can do for themselves and for the Air Force – don’t get pigeonholed.”

Continue reading “Air National Guard chief inspired by mother”

So much for fitness insanity, and excuses

Most times I’ve come home from work so far this year, my wife asks me the same thing: “What are you doing for a workout?”

My first instinct is to tell her: “I’m taking today off, honey. I’m tired. But I’ll get back on it tomorrow.”

But my wife, knowing very well that my Air Force Physical Fitness Test is coming, isn’t much for lame excuses or my predictable cop outs. She wants me to choose how, not if, there will be exercise.

Continue reading “So much for fitness insanity, and excuses”